Do Foxes Eat Snakes?

  • 5 min read
  • Foxes, Snakes
Do Foxes Eat Snakes?

Foxes are the kings of mischief. They can get in all sorts of trouble and are opportunistic when looking for food. But today we’re covering if they can catch and eat snakes of all animals.

Do foxes eat snakes? 

Being omnivorous some foxes do occasionally eat snakes. They usually eat all types of foods derived from animals and plants but the most common prey of foxes are large insects and small mammals and birds.

RELATED: Do Foxes Eat Deer? (And Who Eats Foxes?)

What animals eat snakes? 

Along with foxes, there are certain other mammals that kill and eat snakes like weasels. Certain birds like eagles and hawks also catch, kill and eat snakes as snakes are one of the main sources of food for these birds.

Even big snakes can also eat smaller snakes. Some of the predators also eat poisonous snakes. 

Fox eating a snake
Fox eating a snake

There are certain snakes that either bite or strike when they are threatened like garter snakes. Raccoons, hawks, large snakes, mink, and foxes are all predators that eat snakes.  

RELATED: Do Foxes Bark? (What noises do they make?)

What do foxes eat? 

The diet of foxes is really diverse. They eat all types of meat including carrion as well as rodents, rabbits, frogs, earthworms and frogs, etc. as they are experts in hunting.

But they are omnivores by nature instead of being carnivorous as they also eat fruits and berries. In urban areas, they also catch rats and pigeons as well as search for trash cans to find their food

Foxes Infographic
Foxes Infographic

The cubs of foxes depend on their mother for their food as by birth they remain blind and deaf. Just like the puppies of domestic dogs, they depend on the milk from their mother.

When cubs are 4 weeks old they start eating solid food and at the age of 12 weeks, they get accustomed to eating all types of food other than mother’s milk. 

RELATED: Do Foxes Eat Squirrels? (Can They Catch Them?)

A fox is hunting a vole in the snow in Japan
A fox is hunting a vole in the snow in Japan

How do foxes search for their food

Foxes normally try to search for their food in fields and forests. They use their nose to smell out their prey and jump over it as their sense of smell is very strong. They also eat carcasses encountered by them as well as by searching and hunting.

But sometimes they can also steal some meat from the meal of a wolf or bear when they are hungry. Foxes can prey on pet birds but usually, they do not attack pet dogs and cats. 

Where do foxes live? 

Normally foxes live in rural regions like farmlands, wetlands, and woodlands but you need not go countryside to see them. You can also see foxes in urban areas hiding under the sheds or running through the streets.

But rural foxes are generally shy by nature. 

RELATED: Do Bears Eat Foxes?

Can foxes be tamed? 

Though it is a controversial question, they can be tamed. 

  • Normally you must avoid touching or feeding foxes by hand while trying to tame in urban areas. You should respect them as wild animals and should not become too bold to feed or touch them by hand. Due to the curiosity about the aggressive behavior of foxes, many people are scared of foxes in urban areas. 
  • In urban areas, you should also avoid feeding foxes with an excessive amount of food as it makes them arrogant. 
  • You should put their food out somewhere so that they can take it to eat or store. You can discourage foxes from digging up your garden or nearby areas if you provide them the food they like to eat. 
  • However, if you leave the food not eaten by the foxes out then you can attract other unwanted animals like rats etc. 
  • While feeding urban foxes you should try to give them raw or cooked meat or tinned food specially prepared for dogs as meat protein is the main part of the diet of foxes. 
  • If you set a feeding routine then you can feed it foxes around the year. They will come to your garden at a particular time and wait for their diet. 
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Adrian Volenik

I've lived around animals my whole life and I hold a Diploma in Animal Physiology. When I'm not reading or writing about wild animals, health and fitness, and technology, you can find me playing with my son and two cats. My pastimes include running, playing video games, and solving the NY Times crossword.